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The proposed legislation would allow BIC to bar union officials from representing sanitation workers if they are found to be “lacking good character, honesty and integrity,” reports ProPublica.

Waste360 Staff

January 14, 2019

2 Min Read
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A bill that would authorize New York City’s Business Integrity Commission (BIC) to oversee the private trash industry by directly policing labor unions was introduced by the city’s Sanitation Committee on January 9.

The measure would allow BIC to bar union officials from representing sanitation workers if they are found to be “lacking good character, honesty and integrity,” according to a ProPublica report.  

The bill was introduced by City Councilman Antonio Reynoso and comes after a series of reports by ProPublica exposed the backgrounds and business dealings of two unions that represented workers at many of the industry’s major companies.

ProPublica has more details:

The chairman of the New York City Council’s Sanitation Committee introduced a bill Wednesday that would authorize the agency overseeing the private trash industry to directly police the labor unions at scores of companies across the city.

The legislation would allow the oversight agency, the Business Integrity Commission, or BIC, to bar union officials from representing workers in the industry if they are found to be lacking “good character, honesty and integrity.” Any union representing waste industry workers would be required to disclose their officers to the BIC and, in some cases, submit them to fingerprinting. The agency could oust union officials from the industry if they have certain criminal convictions, or for associating with members or associates of organized crime or anyone convicted of a racketeering activity. A disqualified union officer would have to leave their post within 14 days.

Related:NYC Business Integrity Commission Suspends Sanitation Salvage's License

The proposed bill, introduced by City Councilman Antonio Reynoso, comes after a series of reports by ProPublica exposing the backgrounds and business dealings of two unions that together represented workers at many of the industry’s major companies.

Read the full article here.

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