Sponsored By

Researchers Develop New Rewritable Paper to Help Reduce Paper Waste

The rewritable paper is made of tungsten oxide and a common polymer used in both medicines and food.

Waste360 Staff

November 7, 2016

1 Min Read
Researchers Develop New Rewritable Paper to Help Reduce Paper Waste

In an effort to reduce paper waste, researchers Ting Wang, Dairong Chen and colleagues from Shandong University in China have developed a rewritable paper made of tungsten oxide and a common polymer used in both medicines and food.

To “print” on the paper, the researchers exposed it to ultraviolet light for 30 seconds or more and to make pictures or words, they used a stencil to turn the exposed parts blue. Lastly, to speed up the process of erasing, the researchers used heat to make the color disappear in 30 minutes.

DnaIndia.com has more:

Scientists have developed a low-cost, environmentally friendly way to create printed materials with rewritable paper that can considerably reduce paper wastage.

Researchers Ting Wang, Dairong Chen and colleagues from Shandong University in China made the new material out of tungsten oxide and a common polymer used in medicines and food.

Even in the present digital age, the world still relies on paper and ink, most of which ends up in landfills or recycling centres.

Read the full story here.

About the Author(s)

Stay in the Know - Subscribe to Our Newsletters
Join a network of more than 90,000 waste and recycling industry professionals. Get the latest news and insights straight to your inbox. Free.

You May Also Like