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Heritage-Crystal Clean to Pay $1.1 Million for Hazardous Waste Violations

As part of the settlement, HCC will ensure measures to ensure proper management of hazardous waste at its facilities. The estimated cost of these compliance measures is at least $1.6 million.

Waste360 Staff

December 8, 2023

2 Min Read
Heritage-Crystal Clean

Heritage-Crystal Clean, LLC (HCC) has reached a settlement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Justice to resolve allegations of hazardous waste management violations at multiple facilities. The settlement, announced jointly by the EPA and the Department of Justice, requires HCC to pay civil fines totaling $1.162 million.

The violations are related to the mishandling of hazardous waste and used oil at HCC facilities in Indianapolis; Shreveport, La.; Atlanta; Fairless Hills, Pa.; and Denver, Colo. HCC is accused of transporting hazardous waste without proper manifests, storing hazardous waste without required permits, and failing to comply with various hazardous waste management requirements.

As part of the settlement, HCC will ensure measures to ensure proper management of hazardous waste at its facilities. The estimated cost of these compliance measures is at least $1.6 million.

Additionally, HCC must apply for a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permit at its Indianapolis facility, and during the interim period, it must adhere to specified measures, including frequent inspections and elimination of open venting of certain tanks.

The settlement also includes a sampling program to assess the hazardous waste characteristics of a parts-washing solvent referred to as "142 solvent." HCC must promptly remove any solvent drums exhibiting hazardous waste characteristics and manage them in accordance with regulations. The agreement requires HCC to distribute educational materials to parts-washing customers in specific circumstances and mandates third-party audits at designated facilities to ensure future compliance.

The five HCC facilities covered by the settlement are acknowledged by the EPA to be situated in communities with potential environmental justice concerns. The improved controls and practices mandated by the consent decree are expected to benefit nearby communities by reducing emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and minimizing the risk of exposure to hazardous wastes.

Source: EPA

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