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ISRI Roundtable Discusses Next Potential Top Recycling Market ISRI Twitter

ISRI Roundtable Discusses Next Potential Top Recycling Market

A recent ISRI panel discussed what the next successful recycling market could be to replace China.

During a recent Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI) Commodity Roundtable in Chicago, panelists discussed whether a new successful market to replace China as the top market for U.S. recyclers will rise.

Waste Dive reports that all speakers agreed that “despite new opportunities, no single country is capable of picking up the slack from China's change of course.” According to the report, speakers discussed potential opportunities overseas and in the Western Hemisphere.

Ultimately, the ISRI panel projected continued technology investments will help recyclers meet evolving needs, as quality standards are increasing in importance domestically and overseas.

Waste Dive has more information:

For years, China reigned as the top spot for U.S. recyclers to sell recovered materials. Now that import restrictions and tariffs have turned that on its head, the big question is whether a new boom market will rise.

The most simple, but ambiguous, answer is: It's complicated.

Last week, speakers at the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI) Commodity Roundtables in Chicago tackled this question head on. The panelists covered conditions, domestically and abroad, that could influence which countries present the best opportunities for recyclers looking to sell their materials. All agreed that despite new opportunities, no single country is capable of picking up the slack from China's change of course.

Read the full article here.

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