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Raleigh Recycling Site Shutting Down After Years of Illegal Dumping Issues

A local recycling site in Raleigh, North Carolina is being shut down after repeated abuse to the site and an overabundance of illegal dumping.

June 21, 2023

1 Min Read
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Carolyn Franks / Alamy Stock Photo

A local recycling site in Raleigh, North Carolina is being shut down after repeated abuse to the site and an overabundance of illegal dumping.

Jaycee Park, which sits near NC State, houses multiple recycling and disposal collectors but recently has been used improperly as locals are wrongfully dumping trash at the collection site, as well as just leaving piles of garbage scattered on the ground.

Residents have reported seeing all kinds of litter scattered around the site including furniture, cardboard boxes, and other scraps of trash for the last few years. However, locals don’t think the closure will solve the issue.

“The furniture has increased. This is not a dumping site. Perhaps people don’t realize it,” said Stephani Jusino, a resident who uses the facility.

The site was first opened in 1980 as a local recycling center for residents to bring their household recycling.

Stan Joseph, the director of solid waste services for Raleigh, said that the site was long serving its intended purpose.

Joseph also mentioned he had talked to residents to find solutions on how to stop all the illegal dumping. Even after installing surveillance cameras, getting Raleigh police to patrol the area, and conducting more frequent cleanups, it was never enough.

“Ultimately, we didn’t see a decrease in the dumping. It was happening in hours we weren’t aware,” Joseph said.

Jusino fears that closing the site won’t stop the dumping and believes residents will just litter in the nearby woods.

“The city is prepared for that and plans to educate the public on alternatives," Joseph said. “What I want for them to look at is an enhancement of our city and to make sure our parks are pristine and clean for them to use.”

Read the full article here.

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