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ISRI Chairman-elect Gary Champlin delivers the State of the Industry Address during the 2019 ISRI Convention & Exposition in Los Angeles.

ISRI Focuses on Safety, Design for Recycling at 2019 Convention

During the final day of its 2019 Convention & Exposition, ISRI urged attendees to pay attention to safety and presented its Design for Recycling and safety awards.

The Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI) on April 11 wrapped up its 2019 ISRI Convention & Exposition in Los Angeles with a State of the Industry Address from ISRI Chairman-elect Gary Champlin. Champlin, who is general manager of Kansas-based Champlin Tire Recycling, urged attendees to “pay attention,” particularly when it comes to safety.

During the event, ISRI Chairman Brian Shine also presented ISRI’s Design for Recycling Award to Nestlé Waters North America. In addition, as part of its Circle of Safety Excellence (COSE) initiative, ISRI presented three new safety awards recognizing COSE member companies for commitment to the safety of employees. ISRI also announced the winners of its seventh annual Vehicle Safety Awards.

Here is a recap from the final day of ISRI’s 2019 Convention & Exposition:

Going back to 1950 when his grandfather, and then father, started a tire retail, wholesale and retreading operation, Champlin explained that some of his earliest memories—and first job—came from the family business.

“To this day I could still hear my grandfather saying, ‘Gary, pay attention or you will be paying everyone else,’” said Champlin.

Champlin Tire Recycling, based in Concordia, Kan., was created in 1992 due to changes in state laws around tires and solid waste.

“We saw a business opportunity then,” explained Champlin. “It has been quite a ride over the last 27 years and has been filled with more challenges than opportunities than I ever would have expected. But we are still here because we paid attention.”

Champlin went on to say that running a business successfully takes management skills, confidence in people and products and effort. As many in the scrap industry are well aware, business efforts can be changed in a day by government decisions and by changes to regulations.

“This creates winners and losers in the private sector—that’s where your trade association comes in,” added Champlin. “Personally, I know no industry that is stronger than its trade association. And I know of no trade association out there that is stronger than ISRI. And ISRI got that way because we pay attention.”

Champlin pointed to three ISRI programs that aim to help companies share data and experiences, while paying attention to safety as a core value:

  1. ISRI’s Safety and Environmental Council (ISEC): ISEC is a group of likeminded companies that meets twice a year to learn, share and mentor in regard to current and impending health, safety, environmental and transportation issues that affect all sectors of the recycling industry.
  2. ISRI Circle of Safety Excellence: The group serves the interests of the recycling industry with a core focus around safety and is open to all ISRI members. Members offer their assistance with safety by sharing ideas, mentoring and continually improving safety within their own organizations.
  3. Recycling Industry Operating Standard (RIOS): RIOS helps set standards in operations, and those standards become the ruler you use for performance. RIOS aims to help companies improve operations in safety, environment and efficiency, giving them the ability to improve their bottom line. RIOS focuses on three areas: quality, safety and environment.

Design for Recycling Award

Nestlé Waters North America was presented with ISRI’s award specifically for the design of its Nestlé Pure Life 700ml bottle made from 100 percent recycled PET plastic (rPET).

Fernando Mercé, president and CEO of Nestlé Waters North America, accepted the award, explaining that creating a more sustainable bottle starts with thoughtful design—and a lot of courage.

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“I can truly say that for us, at Nestlé Waters, the recyclability of our products isn’t an afterthought,” said Mercé. “It’s something we embed at every stage of product development. We are dealing with an existential crisis right now in our industry. Everywhere you look, there is a narrative taking shape that says recycling doesn’t work. This is especially true when it comes to plastic. We are on a journey to transform our company and the entire beverage industry. Through our actions on this journey, we intend to change this narrative. It starts with how you answer this one question: Is plastic a waste product or is it a valuable resource?”

“We see plastic as a valuable commodity, and when you see something as having value, you will inherently treat it differently,” he added. “That is why we are constantly thinking about every single piece of our packaging—down to the glue and the labels, so they are as valuable as possible at the end of their useful life.”

PET plastic bottles were never meant to be thrown away, stressed Mercé. They were designed to be captured, recycled and reused again and again. He explained that Nestlé Waters’ goal is to take the “single” out of single-use plastic bottles once and for all.

“We believe bottles like our Nestlé Pure Life bottle are the future of packaging,” he said. “To be recognized with this award is particularly significant. It is significant because this bottle—which is made from 100 percent recycled plastic and is 100 percent recyclable, so it can be made into another bottle—is proof that a fully circular economy is within our reach. While we are proud to have the only major nationally distributed water bottle on the market to be made using 100 percent rPET, in the end, we want this kind of packaging to become the norm rather than the exception.”

Equally as important as designing for recycling is helping to increase collection rates, noted Mercé. He stressed the importance of investing in recycling infrastructure. It’s also just as important for businesses to help drive new behavior by inspiring consumers to think and act differently when it comes to plastic.

“We are committed to working hand-in-hand with industry professionals, our consumers, customers, NGOs [nongovernmental organizations] and government officials to help create a more robust recycling market here in the U.S.,” concluded Mercé. “There is a lot of good work happening right here in California. Earlier this week, lawmakers in Sacramento considered recycling content in beverage containers. We are an active participant in these discussions to ensure policies further support the development of a robust supply of recycled content in this state. But perhaps more importantly, we are committed to using the power of our business and brands to achieve a more circular economy—not 10 or 20 years from now, but today.”

Safety Awards Recipients

ISRI members recognized for top Vehicle Safety Records have demonstrated a commitment to the safety of employees and public through effective fleet safety programs, according to ISRI. The awards come in two categories: Best Fleet Award and Pacesetter Award.

award

The Best Fleet Award, based on class, is presented to the ISRI member with the lowest vehicle accident rate and the lowest U.S. Department of Transportation Recordable rate in 2018. The Pacesetter Award, also based on class, is granted to the ISRI member using the same criteria as the Best Fleet Award but covering a three-year period, in this case January 1, 2016, through December 31, 2018.

This year’s award recipients are:

2018 Best Fleet Award, Small Class 300,000-500,000 miles:

  • Reserve Management Group – Reserve Transport LLC, Twinsburg, Ohio
  • Shine Bros Corp., Spencer, Iowa
  • Berman Brothers Inc., Jacksonville, Fla.

2018 Pacesetter Award, Small Class 300,000-500,000 miles:

  • Berman Brothers Inc., Jacksonville, Fla.

2018 Best Fleet Award, Intermediate Fleet 500,001-1,000,000 miles:

  • Rochester Iron & Metal, Inc., Rochester, Ind.
  • TJN Enterprises, Inc., Sioux Falls, S.D.
  • Cozzi Recycling, Bellwood, Ill.

2018 Pacesetter Award, Intermediate Class 500,001-1,000-000 miles:

  • Rochester Iron & Metal, Inc., Rochester, Ind.

2018 Best Fleet Award, Medium Class 1,000,001-5,000,000 miles:

  • Metal Exchange Corporation, Saint Louis
  • Prolerized New England Company LLC, Concord, N.H.
  • Schupan & Sons, Inc., Kalamazoo, Mich.

2018 Pacesetter Award, Medium Class 1,000,001-5,000,000 miles:

  • United Scrap Metal, Inc., Cicero, Ill.

ISRI also announced the winners of its first-ever Circle of Safety Excellence Occupational Awards. Those recognized are as follows:

Best-in-Class Award, Small Class 22,000-100,000 hours or 11-50 employees:

  • SA Recycling, Savannah, Ga. (Facility)
  • Alter Trading, Davenport, Iowa (Facility)
  • Pratt Recycling, Inc., Staten Island, N.Y. (Facility)

Best-in-Class Award, Intermediate Class 102,000-200,000 hours or 51-100 employees:

  • Southern Metals Recycling, Inc., Savannah, Ga. (Company)
  • United Scrap Metal PA, LLC, Philadelphia (Company)
  • United Scrap Metal VA, LLC, Richmond, Va. (Company)

Best-in-Class Award, Medium Class 202,000-500,000 hours or 101-250 employees:

  • Western Metals Recycling (Subsidiary of The David Joseph Company), Sandy, Utah
  • Sierra Recycling and Demolition, Bakersfield, Calif. (Company)
  • Advantage Metals Recycling (Subsidiary of The David Joseph Company), Kansas City, Mo.

Best-in-Class Award, Large Class greater than 502,000 hours or more than 251 employees:

  • United Scrap Metal, Inc., Cicero, Ill. (Facility)
  • United Scrap Metal, Inc., Cicero, Ill. (Company)
  • Audubon Metals, LLC, Henderson, Ky. (Company)

Superior Achievement Award, Small Class 22,000-100,000 hours or 11-50 employees:

  • SA Recycling, Savannah, Ga. (Facility)
  • Alter Trading, Davenport, Iowa (Facility)
  • Pratt Recycling, Inc., Staten Island, N.Y. (Facility)
  • Schupan Industrial Recycling, Elkhart, Ind. (Facility)
  • Pratt Recycling, Inc., Shreveport, La. (Facility)
  • SA Recycling, Tucson, Ariz. (Facility)
  • Pratt Paper IN LLC, Valparaiso, Ind. (Company)
  • United Scrap Metal, MO LLC, Saint Louis (Company)
  • Schupan Industrial Recycling, Kalamazoo, Mich. (Facility)
  • Alter Trading ATP, Davenport, Iowa (Facility)
  • Pratt Recycling, Inc., Gary, Ind. (Facility)
  • Green Metals, Inc. – Texas Non-Metals, San Antonio (Facility)
  • Alter Trading, Lincoln, Neb. (Facility)
  • Alter Trading – ABW, Bettendorf, Iowa (Facility)
  • J. Trockman & Sons, Inc., Evansville, Ind. (Company)
  • Pratt Recycling, Inc., Rock Hill, S.C. (Facility)
  • Alter Trading, Riceville, Iowa (Facility)
  • Alter Trading, Kearney, Neb. (Facility)
  • Pratt Recycling, Inc., Salem, N.C. (Facility)
  • Alter Trading, Saint Paul, Minn. (Facility)
  • Alter Trading – NF, Peoria, Ill. (Facility)

Superior Achievement Award, Intermediate Class 102,000-200,000 hours or 51-100 employees:

  • Southern Metals Recycling, Inc., Savannah, Ga. (Company)
  • United Scrap Metal PA LLC, Philadelphia (Company)
  • United Scrap Metal VA LLC, Richmond, Va. (Company)

Superior Achievement Award, Medium Class 202,000-500,000 hours or 101-250 employees:

  • Western Metals Recycling (Subsidiary of The David Joseph Company), Sandy, Utah
  • Sierra Recycling and Demolition, Bakersfield, Calif. (Company)
  • Advantage Metals Recycling (Subsidiary of The David Joseph Company), Kansas City, Mo.
  • SA Recycling, Anaheim, Calif. (Facility)

Superior Achievement Award, Large Class greater than 502,000 hours or more than 251 employees:

  • United Scrap Metal, Inc., Cicero, Ill. (Facility)
  • United Scrap Metal, Inc., Cicero, Ill. (Company)

Rising Star Award, Small Class 22,000-100,000 hours or 11-50 employees:

  • Pratt Recycling, Inc., Fayetteville, N.C. (Facility)
  • Pratt Recycling, Inc., Denton, Texas (Facility)

Rising Star Award, Intermediate Class 102,000-200,000 hours or 51-100 employees:

  • SA Recycling, Bakersfield, Calif. (Facility)
  • Texas Port Recycling (Subsidiary of The David Joseph Company), Houston
  • Alter Trading, Davenport, Iowa (Facility)
  • Becker Iron & Metal, Venice, Ill. (Company)
  • United Scrap Metal NC LLC, Charlotte, N.C. (Company)
  • SA Recycling, El Paso, Texas (Facility)
  • Pratt Recycling, Inc., Duncan, S.C. (Facility)
  • Berman Bros, Inc., Jacksonville, Fla. (Company)

Rising Star Award, Medium Class 202,000-500,000 hours or 101-250 employees:

  • Metal Recycling Services (Subsidiary of The David Joseph Company), Monroe, N.C.
  • SA Recycling (Phoenix), Phoenix (Facility)
  • SA Recycling (Terminal Island), Terminal Island, Calif. (Facility)
  • Elgin Recycling, Gilbert, Ill. (Company)
  • Pratt Recycling, Inc., Conyers, Ga. (Facility)
  • SA Recycling (Decatur), Decatur, Ala. (Facility)
  • SA Recycling (East Point), East Point, Ga. (Facility)

Rising Star Award, Large Class greater than 502,000 hours or more than 251 employees:

  • Audubon Metals LLC, Henderson, Ky. (Company)
  • Trademark Metal Recycling (Subsidiary of The David Joseph Company), Tampa, Fla.
  • River Metals Recycling (Subsidiary of The David Joseph Company), Fort Mitchell, Ky.
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