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Shutdown of Detroit Incinerator Prompts Trash Pickup Delays

Shutdown of Detroit Incinerator Prompts Trash Pickup Delays

After the closure of Detroit’s waste-to-energy facility, the city is dealing with residential pickup delays as more of the city’s waste is hauled to landfills.

After years of residents’ complaints of foul odors and noise, Detroit Renewable Power, a decades-old incinerator in Metro Detroit, closed abruptly back in March. Now, the city is dealing with residential pickup delays as more of the city’s waste is sent to area landfills.

According to The Detroit News, hauling distance to landfill means some parts of the are experiencing a several-hour delay in trash pickup. However, the report noted, the waste is still getting picked up and the city hasn't incurred any cost increases.

Detroit Renewable Energy (DRE), which owned and operated Detroit Renewable Power, said the decision to close was driven by financial and community concerns. “Serving our community and being a good neighbor for years to come is our number one priority. The decision ends the odor, noise and other community nuisances and allows Detroit Thermal to focus on investing where it matters,” said DRE CEO Todd Grzech in a statement in March.

The Detroit News has more information:

The abrupt closure of the city's incinerator is prompting some residential pickup delays as more of Metro Detroit's waste heads to area landfills.

After generating complaints of foul odors for years and racking up emissions violations, Detroit Renewable Power's trash burning site near Interstates 94 and 75 shut down in March with little warning.

The move has caused logistical challenges for one of the region's largest residential waste hauling firms and left some of the communities that relied on the plant scrambling for emergency solutions of where to send their trash.

Read the full article here.

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