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Articles from 2015 In June


WasteExpo 2015

Integrity Waste's Ron Falcon Talks about Multifamily Waste Diversion

Integrity Waste specializes in helping multifamily residents and operators increase diversion, and CEO Ron Falcon talked at WasteExpo about how the company achieves that, what some of the challenges are and the legislative drivers pushing for more diversion to happen.

K2 Waste Merges Wisconsin’s Lake Country Disposal

K2 Waste Solutions LLC has acquired Lake Country Disposal (LCD) LLC, based in Menomonee Falls, Wis.

K2 Waste described the deal in a news release as a merger, with LCD adding K2 Waste to its ownership structure and naming K2 as its management team going forward. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

LCD operates commercial and roll-off operations and recently was awarded a large local school district contract. Corpus Christi, Texas-based K2 has no operations in Wisconsin, but Co-President Eric Konik has business and family ties in the Milwaukee area, which he cited as a future strength of the merged company.

“We are excited to add Lake Country Disposal to our organization,” Konik said. “As a resident of the area, I was aware of their history in the marketplace and felt this was a wonderful opportunity for both entities.”

LCD was founded in 2001 by Joe Tate. “LCD’s solid history in the area only adds to our ability to offer a great option for local folks in and around Milwaukee to use a local company with strong ties to the community.  We are anxious to see the growth we can generate together,” Konik said.

K2 formed earlier this year by Konik and Bill Killian, co-president and founder, to buy and start up waste collection firms. K2 made its first acquisition earlier in June, the Phoenix-based residential waste hauler Greenline Waste and Recycling LLC.

The aim for the company is to establish a strategic geographic stable of waste collection companies, focusing on mid-sized markets, single line of business companies, haulers in niche markets and other smaller scale firms. The company said it is currently considering several other acquisitions.

The transaction continues a steady trend of mergers and acquisitions of smaller waste and recycling operations in recent months. JBC Group purchased waste management firm A&D Environmental Services Inc. Earlier this month a new holding company, Mountain Waste & Recycling Inc., was formed to merge and manage two waste haulers and consider expanding the operation. It will serve as the parent company for Mountain Roll-Offs and InterMountain Waste & Recycling.

And Gold Medal Services LLC purchased substantially all the assets of waste hauler Casworth Enterprises Inc. and recycler Blue River Resources LLC.

In her June Waste360 Business Insights column, industry financial analyst Leone Young wrote of her impressions from WasteExpo 2015 that the bigger companies believe that high seller expectations for valuations on acquisitions is a stumbling block to more deals getting done.

 

Waste360 Video Network

Automann WasteExpo highlights

 

Mike Baker, Sales Manager at Automann, talks about his firm’s position as a global distributor of aftermarket truck and trailer components. The firm collaborates with its network of distributors, to service a range of businesses, including the waste and recycling industry. Among the firm’s latest highlights is the development of a site that features more than 15,000 of its products. Parts can be found through their OEM or Automann serial numbers, and the site includes drawings and full specs of the parts on offer.

Oklahoma Landfill Shut Down Over Laundry List of Violations

The Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) has suspended the permit of a landfill in Tecumseh until a number of environmental compliance issues are resolved, including visible animal carcasses and other waste that wasn’t sufficiently covered.

The state’s order also notes that, during a routine inspection in 2011, DEQ officials found the landfill to be on fire, and later found that the fire had already been burning for three days. This was not the only fire in recent years, according to the DEQ order.

The DEQ order also details an exchange between the agency and the landfill’s owner, Absolute Waste Solutions, in 2012 about a financial assurance trust fund for the landfill. The landfill owners informed DEQ that they were winding down the site, with plans to close in the future. But nearly three years later, the landfill owners still have not provided DEQ with the necessary information to fulfill that plan.

According the DEQ, Absolute Waste Systems has paid its $10,000 fine, and is working toward resolving the compliance issues at the landfill.

By 2014, a follow-up inspection at the site revealed that there were still animal carcasses in the open with pools of standing blood, leaking leachate with no records of quarterly inspections or annual cleanouts, exposed trash, and steeper slopes than what is permitted. A month later, multiple hot spots and smoke were observed. Despite working with the landfill owner to reach compliance at the site, DEQ says the site remained in non-compliance during a February 2015 inspection, and the owners are more than $171,000 behind in trust fund payments.

To reach compliance DEQ requires that the landfill owners fully fund its trust fund and install operational scales within 120 days, and that it address smoking and subsurface hotspots within 60 days of the order. The order also requires a number of other compliance measures to be completed in similar time frames, ranging from groundwater and gas monitoring to better litter control and record-keeping.

Additionally, while the DEQ could have fined the site up to $10,000 per day for violations, it ordered a single $10,000 fine to be paid.

Attorney’s for Absolute Waste Solutions have replied to DEQ, stating they are working to reach compliance on the violations and even have plans to add a new cell to expand the landfill.

DEQ officials did not return calls by press time on the status of the violations or compliance order.

On Location

EREF's Staley Previews Findings to be Discussed at Recycling Summit

David Bodamer, Executive Director of Content for Waste360, talks to Bryan Staley, President and CEO of the Environmental Research & Education Foundation, about the annual charitable auction at WasteExpo, the research that EREF does throughout the year, and the upcoming inaugural Waste360 Recycling Summit in Chicago, IL, September 9-11, 2015. See why you can’t miss this new event!

 www.waste360RecyclingSummit.com

On Location

NWRA's Germain Lays Out What to Expect from the Waste360 Recycling Summit

David Bodamer, Executive Director of Content for Waste360, talks to Anne Germain, Director of Waste and Recycling Technology at the National Waste & Recycling Association, about the inaugural Waste360 Recycling Summit in Chicago, IL, September 9-11, 2015. See why you can’t miss this new event!  

www.waste360RecyclingSummit.com 

Need to Know

Oakland's New Recycling Program Offers Expanded Composting, Bulky Pickup Services

After a long and contentious fight over Oakland's lucrative garbage contracts, the city is rolling out new services on July 1 — and for some residents, the program will bring new opportunities to recycle and compost. Under the new contract, Waste Management, the Texas-based corporation that sued the city last year after it initially lost the contracts, will be the exclusive provider of trash and composting services for Oakland residents and businesses while California Waste Solutions, an Oakland-based company, will be the sole provider of recycling services for all residents. Civicorps, a local nonprofit that provide youth job training programs, will also help provide composting services for businesses as part of the contract agreement. (Commercial recycling remains outside of the city's franchise). 

Continue reading at the East Bay Express

Need to Know

Hazardous-Waste Incinerator to Pay Fine for Ash Cloud

waste incinerator

Days after an eastern Ohio hazardous-waste incinerator malfunctioned and sent an ash cloud over surrounding neighborhoods, tests showed high levels of arsenic and lead on a nearby backyard play slide and a pickup truck.

The findings were “problematic,” according to an email sent by an Ohio Department of Health program administrator to colleagues after the July 2013 incident.

The email said the amount could have been harmful in the short-term to a child.

The levels of lead on the backyard slide in East Liverpool were more than twice the U.S Environmental Protection Agency’s soil standard. Levels of arsenic and lead on the truck were even higher.

Continue reading here

Need to Know

Plano, Texas, to Consider Adding Clothing to its Recycling Program

recycled-clothing

Plano could become the first city in Texas to collect smelly shoes, torn shirts and threadbare socks for recycling.

The city is considering partnering with a company that finds a second life for worn-out clothing and small household items that are often tossed in the trash.

“The value of that material is one of the highest in the waste stream. It makes sense to capture it,” said Adam Winfield, president of Ohio-based Simple Recycling, who recently presented the clothing recycling program to the Plano City Council.

Continue reading at The Dallas Morning News

Need to Know

Nuverra Awarded North Dakota Research Grant to Study Use of Recycled Drill Cuttings in Road Applications

Nuverra Environmental Solutions, a Scottsdale, Arizona-based providers of environmental solutions to the energy market, announced it has been awarded a $744,000 scientific research grant by the North Dakota Industrial Commission Oil and Gas Research Council to demonstrate the beneficial use of recycled oil well drill cuttings through Nuverra's Terrafficient process.

"We believe the conversion of drilling waste to valuable products that can be entirely reused will have a significant impact toward reducing the environmental footprint of oil and gas development, reduce material and transportation costs, and support environmental sustainability," says Mark Johnsrud, Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer.

"As the industry generates higher volumes of drill cuttings with multiwell pads and higher well densities, we identified the need for an alternative that will reduce the volume of waste and provide beneficial reuse options for the treated cuttings," Johnsrud explains. "The Terrafficient process makes it possible to turn drilling waste into reusable products, and we intend to prove that out through three demonstration projects funded, in part, by this grant.

Continue reading here