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Nth Cycle Awarded $250,000 InnovateMass Grant

Nth Cycle NthCycle.png

BOSTON, MA Nth Cycle, the metal processing and recycling technology company, has been awarded a $250,000 grant by the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) through their InnovateMass program. InnovateMass is specifically designed to provide targeted, strategic support to companies deploying new clean energy technologies with a strong potential for commercialization. Nth Cycle’s clean and modular electro-extraction technology can reliably salvage critical minerals from a variety of e-waste and low-grade mine tailings for use in new lithium-ion battery production in the U.S.. Salvaging and recycling domestic critical minerals–that are used in dozens of clean energy technologies –is crucial for building the clean energy future domestically.

“MassCEC is pleased to support the commercialization of technologies that empower a local economy for the energy transition,” said MassCEC CEO Steve Pike. “Critical minerals are an essential enabler of the renewable energy transition that is needed for the Commonwealth to achieve its climate goals.”

“We’re thankful for the faithMassCEC has shown in us, and it comes at an important time. The clean energy technologies that are so important for our future—electric vehicles, wind turbines, and grid energy storage—are built on a foundation of critical metals extracted overseas at great monetary and environmental cost. We’re committed to enabling a low-impact, streamlined supply of these minerals to speed the clean energy transition in North America,” said Megan O’Connor, CEO of Nth Cycle. “This grant will help us bring Nth Cycle’s technology solution to scale even faster.” 

Demand for the critical minerals necessary to power the clean energy transition is growing exponentially. Nth Cycle’s unique, modular electro-extraction technology is used by battery recyclers and miners as an alternative or enhancement to older, dirtier processing technologies. Nth Cycle’s technology transforms the outputs of electronics recycling, untapped mining resources, and waste from existing mines into high-purity critical minerals ready to be used in new production without polluting furnaces or harsh chemical waste.

About Nth Cycle

Nth Cycle is a metal processing technology company that works with recyclers and miners. Our customizable and clean electro-extraction technology installs onsite to recover critical minerals from separated e-waste and low-grade mine tailings. We are the heart of metals processing – the crucial step that profitably separates critical minerals from other elements, transforming them into production-grade feedstocks for the energy transition. At Nth Cycle, we believe all the critical minerals needed for the energy transition are already in circulation today. We just didn’t have a clean, profitable way of retrieving them, until now. 

About MassCEC

The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) is dedicated to accelerating the success of clean energy technologies, companies, and projects in the Commonwealth—while creating high-quality jobs and long-term economic growth for the people of Massachusetts. Since its inception in 2009, MassCEC has helped clean energy companies grow, supported municipal clean energy projects, and invested in residential and commercial renewable energy installations creating a robust marketplace for innovative clean technology companies and service providers. MassCEC constructed and operates the Wind Technology Testing Center and the New Bedford Marine Commerce Terminal.  Massachusetts Energy and Environmental Affairs Secretary Kathleen Theoharides chairs MassCEC’s board of directors. 

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