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Chemical Recycling Bill Advances in Texas

If the law is passed, Texas will join Florida, Wisconsin, Georgia, Iowa and Tennessee in passing similar legislation.

Texas could be the sixth state overall and the third state this year to pass legislation promoting technologies that will convert post-consumer plastics into valuable raw materials via chemical recycling.

If signed by Texas Gov. Greg Abbott, the measure would prohibit the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality from considering post-consumer polymers or recyclable, recoverable feedstocks as solid waste “if they were converted using pyrolysis or gasification into a valuable product,” according to Recycling Today.

The report noted that Texas is the largest chemical manufacturing state in the U.S., with more than $117 billion of industry investment. If the law is passed, Texas will join Florida, Wisconsin, Georgia, Iowa and Tennessee in passing similar legislation.

Recycling Today has more details:

If signed by Governor Greg Abbott, Texas will become the sixth state—and the third state this year—to pass legislation to promote advanced plastics recycling and recovery technologies, which convert post-consumer plastics into valuable raw materials using chemical recycling.

Texas Legislature passed HB 1953 May 6. The bill would prohibit the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) from considering postconsumer polymers or recyclable, recoverable feedstocks as solid waste “if they were converted using pyrolysis or gasification into a valuable product.”

The American Chemistry Council (ACC), Washington, applauded Texas Legislature for signing the bill in a recent news release.

Read the full article here.

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