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Pennsylvania Conducts Waste, Recycling Composition Study

Pennsylvania Conducts Waste, Recycling Composition Study

The study is expected to help DEP adjust its funding and prioritize grant programs.

Pennsylvania’s Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) is conducting a statewide waste and recycling composition study to create a targeted recycling program and optimize collections, Waste Today reports.

As the state faces contamination fee penalties and challenges, DEP’s manager of the division of waste minimization and planning told Waste Today that the study is expected to help the department adjust its funding and prioritize grant programs. Additionally, the study aims to help local governments focus programs on what material is in the stream.

DEP also expects to launch an education campaign that appeals to the next generation of recyclers, the report notes.

Waste Today has more information:

The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) is conducting a statewide waste and recycling composition study with a goal to create a targeted recycling program, optimize collections and provide guidance and assistance to local municipalities, haulers and material recovery facilities (MRFs).

Larry Holley, manager of the division of waste minimization and planning for the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, says one of the biggest challenges the state is facing is contamination fees. He says facilities that have eliminated commodities, including paper and plastics, from recycling programs have been rejecting loads and charging municipalities and small and medium-sized businesses with penalties for contamination.

Read the full article here.

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