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Washington State Moves Forward with Recycled-content Bill

Washington State Moves Forward with Recycled Content Bill

State lawmakers are moving forward with a bill that mandates the use of recycled plastic in beverage bottles.

A bill requiring beverage manufacturers to use at least 10 percent post-consumer plastic content in bottles starting in 2022, 25 percent starting in 2025 and 50 percent starting in 2030 is moving forward in Washington state.

Under the measure, the Washington Department of Ecology would be charged with deciding whether to give beverage companies waivers of the requirements, Resource Recycling reports. In making the determination, the department director would have to evaluate several factors, including the supply and demand for post-consumer plastics, collection rates, bale availability, availability of recycled plastics suitable for meeting the requirements and more, the report notes.

Manufacturers missing the targets would be subject to fees, with the amounts varying depending on how far off target the company is.

Resource Recycling has more:

Washington state lawmakers will send the governor a bill mandating use of recycled plastic in beverage bottles. They also passed a bill banning thin plastic bags and mandating recycled content in thicker reusable bags.

House Bill 2722 requires beverage manufacturers to use an average at least 10% post-consumer content in bottles starting in 2022, 25% starting in 2025 and 50% starting in 2030.

The requirements apply to bottles that are 1 gallon or less and hold water, soda, beer or wine, among other types of drinks.

Read the full article here.

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