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Kentucky Plans Cleanup of Millions of Pounds of CRT Glass Resource Recycling Twitter

Kentucky Plans Cleanup of Millions of Pounds of CRT Glass

E-Scrap News reports an additive will be used for a nearly $3 million glass cleanup left behind from now-closed processor GES.

Millions of pounds of leaded cathode ray tubes (CRT) glass in Kentucky will be treated with an additive in an effort to allow for more cost-efficient disposal of problematic material.

E-Scrap News reports that the additive will be used for a nearly $3 million glass cleanup left behind from now-closed processor Global Environmental Services (GES). According to the report, GES shuttered in late 2015, leaving millions of pounds of CRT glass at its three Kentucky locations: Georgetown, Cynthiana and Winchester.

Since then, attention has been turned to planning the cleanup of 26 million pounds stored inside the Cynthiana and Winchester facilities. According to the report, about 8 million pounds of TVs are stored on pallets in Winchester, and about 18 million pounds of ground glass, along with displays in various stages of processing, are stored inside the Cynthiana warehouse.

E-Scrap News has more:

In Kentucky, a treatment additive will be mixed into millions of pounds of leaded CRT glass, allowing for relatively cheap disposal of the problematic material in a non-hazardous waste landfill.

The additive approach is being used for a nearly $3 million CRT cleanup underway in north-central Kentucky, where state and local officials are dealing with the glass left behind by shuttered processor Global Environmental Services (GES).

GES failed in late 2015, leaving millions of pounds of CRT glass at its three Kentucky locations: Georgetown, Cynthiana and Winchester. A landlord already paid to clean up materials GES buried at its Georgetown location, and the Kentucky Department of Environmental Protection contracted with Chase Environmental Group for the cleanup of outdoor leaded sand piles in Georgetown and Cynthiana.

Read the full article here.

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