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CDC Awards Michigan $1M to Study PFAS Contamination

CDC Awards Michigan $1M to Study PFAS Contamination

The grant will allow the state to contribute to a nationwide health study of PFAS and will allow for the expansion of a multiyear effort underway in West Michigan.

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has awarded the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) a grant to fund a multisite investigation into the relationship between drinking water contaminated with per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) and health affects.

The $1 million grant will allow the state to contribute directly to a nationwide health study of PFAS and will allow the state to expand on a multiyear effort underway in West Michigan communities.

MDHHS was awarded $1 million for year one of the study. The amounts for future years haven't been released.

13 On Your Side has more:

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) is one of only seven recipients to receive a grant from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to fund a multi-site PFAS health study.

According to the Tuesday announcement, the $1 million grant will fund an investigation into the relationship between drinking water contaminated with per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) and health affects.

The grant will allow Michigan to contribute directly to a nationwide health study of PFAS, according to Dr. Joneigh Khaldun, chief medical executive and chief deputy for health for MDHHS. It will also allow the state to expand on a multi-year effort underway in West Michigan communities, including Parchment and northern Kent County.

Read the full article here.

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