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Maryland Lawmakers Approve Renewable Energy Measure

Supporters believe the legislation will boost alternative energy development and jobs, while critics say it supports "polluting industry."

Maryland’s General Assembly just passed a measure mandating that half of the state’s electricity supply come from renewable sources by 2030. The measure appeared defeated until lawmakers revised it to preserve subsidies for the waste-to-energy industry, The Baltimore Sun reports.

Supporters say the legislation could boost wind farms, solar industry jobs in the state and other alternative energy development, according to The Sun. It requires utilities across the state to subsidize solar and wind farms, as well as trash incinerators, hydroelectric dams and paper mills powered with a substance known as black liquor, noted the report.

Critics, on the other hand, say "the program supports polluting industry."

The Baltimore Sun has more details:

Maryland lawmakers approved a dramatic investment in renewable energy in the final hours of the 2019 General Assembly session, passing a measure mandating that half the state’s electricity supply come from renewable sources by 2030.

The proposal appeared doomed as recently as two weeks ago, languishing in the House of Delegates until lawmakers revised it to preserve subsidies for the waste-to-energy industry. Senators had voted earlier in the session to stop subsidizing trash incineration as green energy.

Supporters say the legislation will stem a downturn in solar industry jobs in the state, and could also boost wind farms and other alternative energy development. It requires utilities across the state to subsidize solar and wind farms, as well as trash incinerators, hydroelectric dams and paper mills powered with a substance known as black liquor.

Read the full article here.

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