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Waste Today Explores Norway’s Fully Automated Processing Facility Stadler Video Screenshot

Waste Today Explores Norway’s Fully Automated Processing Facility

The facility is powered by a sorting system installed by German company Stadler Anlagenbau GmbH.

Romerike Avfallsforedling (RoAF), a Norwegian municipal solid waste hauling company, opened the world’s first fully automated mixed waste processing facility in 2016. Waste Today takes an in-depth look at the facility and how RoAF turned what was once just a concept into reality.

The facility is powered by a sorting system installed by German company Stadler Anlagenbau GmbH. According to the report, RoAF collects household and food waste from 10 municipalities in Norway, including Skedsmo, which boasts a population of roughly 53,000.

Food waste and organics are sorted from the material stream and taken to an onsite anaerobic digestor. Plastics, metals and mixed paper are recovered at the facility for further recycling, and waste is incinerated and used for nearby heating and electricity applications. The concept behind the fully automated facility was driven by high labor costs and Norway’s remote location, according to the report.

Waste Today has more:

When fully automated waste and recycling facilities were just a concept in the industry, Norwegian municipal solid waste (MSW) hauling company Romerike Avfallsforedling (RoAF) turned the concept into a reality.

Powered by a sorting system installed by Germany-based Stadler Anlagenbau GmbH, RoAF opened the world’s first fully automated mixed waste processing facility in 2016 in the village of Skedsmokorset, just outside of Oslo, to help meet the needs of Norwegian municipalities that were facing high labor costs. While the concept was three years in the making, Stadler needed just three months to complete construction of the facility.

RoAF collects household and food waste from 10 municipalities in Norway, including Skedsmo, which boasts a population of roughly 53,000 people. When waste arrives at the automated plant, it’s first fed onto a conveyor, which delivers the waste into the sorting plant.

Read the full article here.

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