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anaerobic-digestion

Minnesota County Seeks Anaerobic Digestion Solution

Hennepin County is on the hunt for an entity that could process at least 25,000 tons of organic waste a year via anaerobic digestion.

Hennepin County, Minn., is looking to find a unit that can process organic waste through anaerobic digestion.

The county seeks to find something that could process at least 25,000 tons of organic waste annually. It is asking potential vendors to submit their qualifications and preliminary plans by early September.

According to a Southwest Journal report, the county’s request for information comes as it works toward the goal of recycling 75 percent of waste by 2030. The county specified the goal in its Solid Waste Management Master Plan, which was approved by the Board of Commissioners last November.

The Southwest Journal has more details:

Hennepin County is exploring the potential of processing organic waste through anaerobic digestion.

The county is looking to find an entity that could process at least 25,000 tons of organic waste annually via anaerobic digestion. It’s requesting that potential vendors for the project submit their qualifications and preliminary plans for anaerobically digesting the waste by early September.

Anaerobic digestion is a series of processes in which microorganisms break down biodegradable material in the absence of oxygen, according to the American Biogas Council. The processes lead to the creation of biogas, which can be combusted to generate electricity and heat or can be processed into renewable natural gas and transportation fuels, according to the council.

Read the full article here.

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