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NYC Exploring “Save as You Throw” Program to Incentivize Diversion

The Department of Sanitation held a public hearing last week on the pending contract with Resource Recycling Systems.

The New York Department of Sanitation held a public hearing on its pending contract with Resource Recycling Systems at which a "save as you throw" program was discussed that would explore financial incentives for New York residents to divert more of their waste.

Resource Recycling would be in charge of studying the most effective method for implementing the program. The firm's contract would begin in September and last for at least three years, according to reporting by Crain’s New York Business.

Last year, Waste360 named Marisa Adler to its inaugural Waste360 40 Under 40 list for her work as a senior advisor, strategic planning, for the City of New York Department of Sanitation. Shortly after her selection, Adler moved on to take a position as a senior consultant with Resource Recycling Systems.

Crain’s has more:

The Department of Sanitation held a public hearing last week on the pending contract with Resource Recycling Systems, which would explore financial incentives for New Yorkers to divert more of their waste to recycling, organics and donation streams, and away from landfills.

Residential garbage collection and disposal eats up the bulk of Sanitation's roughly $1.7 billion budget, and free disposal is seen as encouraging New Yorkers to send more waste to landfills than they should. Moreover, despite existing mandates, New Yorkers' overall recycling rate is just 17%, roughly half the rate of other major U.S. cities. To improve those numbers, the new program could require residents to purchase special bags for general waste and offer tax rebates or credits for diverting items to recycling or organics streams, according to a request for proposals issued by the city.

Read the full story here.

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