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discarded chairs

Another Solution for Diverting Furniture Waste from Landfill

Green Standards has developed a program to offer office waste diversion solutions for companies and corporations looking to responsibly decommission their offices and large corporate campuses.

It’s pretty known by now that furniture waste (f-waste) is an estimated 8.5 million ton annual trash problem because more and more companies across the globe are developing innovative programs and initiatives for diverting f-waste from landfill.

Steelcase, a Grand Rapids, Mich.-based furniture designer and manufacturer, for example, is making the transition to a circular economy business model and is working to design more furniture that can be easily broken down to be recycled if it cannot be reused.

Green Standards, a sustainability firm, has also developed a program to offer office waste diversion solutions for companies and corporations looking to responsibly decommission their offices and large corporate campuses.

CleanTechnica has more details:

We often talk about corporate or office waste in the sense of using less paper, less electricity, being more sustainable with our computer use, or switching to greener office products. But I had never truly considered the issue of corporate furniture waste until this press release landed in my inbox.

It’s truly astounding to see the amount of office furniture that’s being wasted each year. Here are some numbers to scare you right out of your swivel chair:

  • According to United States EPA estimates, up to 8.5 million tons, or 17 billion pounds, of office assets end up in US landfills annually.
  • Waste management represents up to 4% of a business or organization’s costs.
  • According to the Business and Institutional Furniture Manufacturer’s Association (BIFMA), $10.2 billion worth of commercial furniture and equipment was produced, sold and used in 2015 in the U.S. alone.

Read the full story here.

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