New York City Issues RFP for Waste Management at Two Marine Transfer Stations

New York City Issues RFP for Waste Management at Two Marine Transfer Stations

New York City has issued a request for proposals (RFP) to manage city waste at two marine transfer stations in Brooklyn, and Progressive Waste Solutions Ltd. is one hauler that is submitting a proposal for the contract, which covers 20 years and up to 3,000 tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) per day.

The New York City Department of Sanitation (DSNY) is seeking proposals to provide the labor, facilities, equipment and services need to accept containers of DSNY-managed waste, according to the city RFP. The proposal calls for the company to load the waste onto barges and deliver the barges to an intermodal site, where the containers will be loaded onto rail cars, a ship or coastal barge. Then the firm transports the containers by rail, ship or barge to a disposal site or intermodal site for disposal.

Vaughan, Ontario-based Progressive said in a news release that its subsidiary, IESI NY Corp., submitted a proposal for the previous contract RFP. The company's proposal included the use of a rail yard in New Jersey, and terms for the use of the site could not be completed with the Port Authority, prompting the DSNY to reissue the RFP.

The contract provides the city with options for two additional five-year periods.

"We have a proud history of serving the people of New York City and are confident that our proposal under the new RFP will again be an attractive one both in terms of cost and service," said Joseph Quarin, Progressive president and CEO. "We are prepared to submit a proposal that still includes us transporting the city's waste by rail to our Seneca Meadows landfill in upstate New York, where we can offer an ideal in-state solution to help reduce waste-related traffic in the city and the city's reliance on out-of-state disposal."

Proposals are due Jan. 9.







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