Redemtech, FCC Launch Program to Provide Used Computers to Low-Income Residents

Redemtech, FCC Launch Program to Provide Used Computers to Low-Income Residents

Electronic waste company Redemtech joined with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and another organization to launch PC Pledge 100, a nationwide campaign to provide used computers to those who can’t afford them.

The Columbus, Ohio-based Redemtech said in a news release that the program aims to provide computers to homes that don’t have one and close the “digital divide,” through corporate donations of personal computers (PCs). Redemtech launched the drive by pledging 200 computers to the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) and an additional 100 computers for nonprofits focused on digital literacy.

The FCC established Connect2Compete (C2C) in 2011 as a $4 billion public-private initiative to promote digital literacy, discounted high-speed Internet and low-cost computers to low-income residents in the United States. Both organizations are based in Washington.

Redemtech is the exclusive provider of Good PC refurbished computers, which include Microsoft software, warranty, technical support and free shipping to all eligible families. Redemtech also will provide free asset recovery and recycling at the end of the product’s life to ensure responsible disposal and minimize corporate donors exposure to environmental liability.

“While a home computer is essential to full participation in today’s society, more than 60 million U.S. homes lack a PC,” said Jill Vaske, Redemtech executive vice president. “Through PC Pledge 100, the business community can help low-income families enjoy a better education, a brighter future and a world of possibilities.”

More than 17 million corporate PCs in the U.S. that are used but still useful go to waste annually because of premature disposal or storage, Redemtech said.


Hide comments


  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.