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Report Reveals Composting Could Improve Denver’s Low Recycling Rate

Approximately 50 percent of the waste that a typical Denver resident produces is compostable, but currently only 6 percent of Denver residents have compost collection.

For the last couple of years, the City of Denver has struggled with improving its recycling rate, which continues to hover around 18 percent. In 2016, the city expanded its composting program with the hope of easing the burden on the city’s landfills. But despite that effort, the City of Denver’s recycling rate did not increase.

At the beginning of this year, the city announced that it has budgeted $3.3 million to add more recycling and composting routes and to fully switch from dumpsters to carts by 2018. And now, a new study conducted by nonprofits Colorado Public Interest Research Group and Eco-Cycle reveals that composting is the key to improving the city’s recycling rate.

Approximately 50 percent of the waste that a typical Denver resident produces is compostable, but currently only 6 percent of Denver residents have a green compost bin that’s collected by the city every other week. The two nonprofits are encouraging the city to expand its composting program to every household to finally improve the city’s recycling rate.

Colorado Public Interest Research Group has more details:

While Denver’s abysmal 20% recycling rate is one of the worst among cities across the country, a new report shows that offering citywide compost collection services could make Denver a recycling leader. The new report released today, by nonprofits CoPIRG and Eco-Cycle, highlighted that approximately 50% of the waste that a typical Denver resident produces is compostable and should go in a green compost bin. Unfortunately, only 6% of Denver residents currently have the green compost bin that is picked up by the city every other week.

Read the full story here.

TAGS: Composting
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