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Minneapolis Residents are Recycling Less Organics Than Expected

Only approximately 4,000 tons of organic waste was sent to a Rosemount facility to be converted into compost.

After seeing success from its pilot program, the City of Minneapolis expanded its curbside organics recycling program citywide in 2016. Now, a year later, program results have revealed that Minneapolis residents are recycling less organics than expected.

More than 45,000 households are enrolled in the program, but only approximately 4,000 tons of organic waste was sent to a Rosemount facility to be converted into compost. That number is about half of what the city expected to receive from program participants.

Star Tribune has more details:

Minneapolis residents eagerly participated in the first year of the city’s new organics recycling program — the largest of its kind in the metro — but so far they’re tossing less than anticipated in the green curbside bins.

More than 45,000 households have signed up for the program since it expanded to the entire city last July, or 43 percent of the eligible single-family homes and small apartment buildings. The city had expected 40 percent of eligible households to participate.

Those residents sent nearly 4,000 tons of organic matter to be converted to compost at a Rosemount facility, rather than incinerated with other trash. But that’s about half what the city expected when it launched the program a year ago, based on a consultant’s projections.

Read the full story here.

TAGS: Residential
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