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food scrap bins

Few Vermonters are Utilizing New Organics Bins

The state's recent requirement of having food scraps, grass clipping and other organic waste collection available at transfer stations isn’t receiving the participation rates that the state expected.

In 2012, the State of Vermont passed a universal recycling law to help reverse decades-long stagnant recycling and composting rates. And according to the state’s Universal Recycling Status Report released last year, the law is working.

While the state has seen many successes with its various universal recycling efforts, its recent requirement of having food scraps, grass clippings and other organic waste collection available at transfer stations isn’t receiving the participation rates that the state expected.

Valley News has more:

Vermont’s effort to move toward so-called universal recycling passed a major milestone last month, when transfer stations were required to begin accepting food scraps, grass clippings and other organic waste.

But even as the solid waste industry builds the infrastructure to handle organic waste, it remains to be seen whether Vermonters will make use of it before 2020, the year that Act 148, the universal recycling law, will require residents to separate out such waste.

In Hartford, those who go to the transfer station on Route 5 may notice a new bucket marked for food scraps at the scale house.

Read the full story here.

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