NSWMA Marks 50th Anniversary of Predecessor Association

Today, May 23, marks the 50th anniversary of the predecessor association of the Washington-based National Solid Wastes Management Association (NSWMA).

On May 23, 1962, a group of solid waste associations came together to form the first national association representing the private sector solid waste industry. They called themselves the National Council of Refuse Disposal Trade Associations (NCRDTA), the NSWMA said in a news release.

The NCRDTA in 1968 became the NSWMA and grew to represent solid waste services companies operating in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

"We're proud of the success that our association has had during the last half century in helping America's solid waste services and recycling industry grow into the $60 billion industry," said Bruce Parker, president and CEO of EIA and the executive vice president of NSWMA. "NSWMA members continue to provide essential, technologically innovative and environmentally-responsive waste services to the communities that they serve. I am optimistic that NSWMA will continue to support our members as they find beneficial uses for waste, such as the production of renewable fuels, power industrial chemicals and other beneficial uses."

When it was first created, NCRDTA was managed by an association management firm in Chicago. On January 12, 1968, the group moved to Washington, was formerly chartered as NSWMA and hired its first three full-time staff members. In 1993 the NSWMA undertook a major reorganization. The Waste and Equipment Technology Association (WASTEC) was formed, and both NSWMA and WASTEC became quasi-independent trade associations under the umbrella of the Environmental Industry Associations (EIA).

The NSWMA represents its members by providing federal and state advocacy capabilities, educational and training opportunities, research, communications support and a variety of networking opportunities at NSWMA organized meetings and events.

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