Recycled Referee Uniforms Hit The Playing Fields In America

GREENVILLE, S.C. - Major League Soccer's (MLS) new, environmentally-friendly referee uniforms made their national debut at the MLS kick-off game be-tween the San Jose Clash and the D.C. United last April.

These uniforms are the first team sport apparel comprised of recycled materials to be worn on American playing fields. Con-structed of yarn made from plastic water bottles and colored with water-based, recyclable inks, the jerseys and shorts help cool the referees by keeping perspiration away from the body.

The uniform manufacturing process starts with collecting the crushed water and soft drink bottles and shredding them into small pellets. The pellets are then dissolved into a residue from which the yarn is drawn out. The water-based ink is heat-transfer printed onto the fabric and can then be separated from its water base and re-used without having to dispose of its alcohol based contaminants.

The teal, red and black jerseys are being used by members of the U.S. Soccer Federation and the United System of In-dependent Soccer Leagues. For more information, contact: Keith Fern-bach, 225 West 34th St., New York, N.Y. 10122. (212) 714-1280. Fax: (212) 695-5685.

New Operation Browning Ferris Industries Inc., Hous-ton, has begun operating what are reportedly the lar-gest landfill gas-to-electricity facilities in the world. The plants are located in Min-neapolis-St. Paul and De-troit.

Partnership The U.S. En-vironmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C., has recognized more than 50 organizations for their efforts to develop environmentally beneficial landfill gas-to-energy projects. Among those recognized are WMX Technologies, Oak Brook, Ill.; Browning Ferris In-dustries, Houston; HDR Inc., Omaha, Neb.; SCS Engineers, Bellevue, Wash.; and Laidlaw Waste Systems, Burlington, Ontario.