Non-Profit Organization Recycles Trade Show Wastes

Sacramento, Calif. - The Califor-nia Landscape Contractors Associ-ation (CLCA), Sacramento, Calif., is doing its part to keep waste out of the state's landfills.

The group diverted and recycled an estimated 75 percent of the 1995 Landscape Industry Show's (LIS) waste stream, according to Jeff Burgess, executive director of Civic & Corporate Envi-ronmental Conser-vation Inc. (CCEC), a non-profit organization that operates cost-efficient recycling programs.

CCEC assisted LIS '95 in recycling more than 1 ton of cardboard, bro-chures, flyers, newspapers, plastic, aluminum and polystyrene cups and plates.

"Hundreds of trade shows across the country generate tons of aluminum, cardboard and polystyrene waste each year," said LIS chair Greg Meyer.

The CLCA also donated leftover living plants and landscaping materials to the City of Long Beach.

"After this year's heavy rains, the city has a huge need for plants," said Jim Kuhl, In-tegrated Resources Bureau manager for the City of Long Beach. "We delivered potted plants and flowers to local hospitals and convalescent homes the day after the show. The rest will be used in a variety of park projects and to beautify our city streets."

The California Landscape Contractors Association reportedly is the nation's oldest and largest organization of licensed landscape and irrigation contractors. Members include landscape architects, suppliers, educators, public employees and students.