This Beer's On the House

THEY SAY RECYCLING BEGINS AT HOME, BUT ON IT? From 1968 until his death in 1988, Houston upholsterer John Milkovisch collected beer cans and used their crushed and dismantled remains to clad and decorate his home. During those 20 years, it is estimated that he downed 50,000 cans of lager, resulting in entire walls of do-it-yourself aluminum siding and dense chains of garlands made from can lids and tabs.

Known to locals simply as the Beer Can House, the structure recently underwent a seven-year, $400,000 restoration in preparation for its dedication as a monument open to the public. On display inside is a quote from Milkovisch, reading, “They say every man should leave something to be remembered by. At least I accomplished that goal.”

As if the biggest beer belly in Texas wasn't enough.
Source: New York Times

Green, By God

SOME PEOPLE INVOKE AL GORE when evangelizing on behalf of the environment. Others call on a higher power. Yale Divinity School recently hosted a conference titled “Renewing Hope: Pathways of Religious Environmentalism,” co-sponsored by the school and the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. The goal of the conference and a similar Forum on Religion and Ecology (FORE) held by Harvard, according to organizers, is to establish a dialogue between theologians and academics on environmental activism.

Both events come in the wake of a 2007 report issued by the Vatican in which Pope Benedict XVI said Catholic churches should become greener and emphasized the need for rainforest preservation. Churches of all faiths have begun instituting recycling programs and even swapping out incandescent light bulbs for compact fluorescents.

It is as it was foretold in “Evan Almighty.”
Source: Republican American