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New Connecticut Law Creates More WTE Opportunities

The law focuses on two main areas: fuel cells and WTE power plants.

The State of Connecticut is one of the leaders of waste-to-energy (WTE) in the U.S. In fact, the state just recently passed a new law that will open more doors for WTE.

The law focuses on two main areas: fuel cells and WTE power plants. For fuel cells, the law creates a large opportunity to win long-term power-purchase contracts with utility companies. And for WTE plants, the law could help drive up long-stagnant prices of renewable energy credits.

One WTE company, Covanta, recently announced an agreement with the Southeastern Connecticut Regional Resource Recovery Authority for waste disposal at the Southeastern Connecticut Resource Recovery Facility located in Preston, Conn. Since 1991, Covanta SECONN has provided waste management services in the region. The WTE facility processes 689 tons of post-recycled municipal solid waste daily into 18 megawatts of energy, enough to power approximately 15,000 homes continuously. The facility also recycles more than 9,000 tons of metal annually.

While that is a success for Covanta, the company recently had to close its 10-acre trash transfer plant due to a significant reduction in waste.

Hartford Business Journal has more:

A new law passed by the state legislature without much fanfare could have a major impact on Connecticut's energy industry, providing a potential lifeline to two important, but struggling sectors: fuel cells and waste-to-energy power plants.

While the two sectors are vastly different, the law provides one common benefit: the chance for more business and revenue.

For fuel cells, the law tees up a sizable opportunity to win coveted long-term power-purchase contracts with utility companies.

And for waste-to-energy plants, policy tweaks could help drive up long-stagnant prices of renewable energy credits, which plants earn and sell to reap a secondary revenue stream.

Read the full story here.

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