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N.H. State Official Acknowledges PFCs Leaking from Former Landfill Site

People living near the Coakley Landfill in New Hampshire met with EPA officials in January over concerns they had about their drinking water.

Michael Wimsatt, the director of the state Department of Environmental Services’ Waste Management Division, voiced concerns about high levels of PFCs found in a brook near the shuttered Coakley Landfill Superfund site.

According to SeaCoastOnline.com, Wimsatt also said “actions need to be implemented at the site to provide additional removal or containment of the contamination in order to mitigate these surface water quality impacts.”

People living near the Coakley Landfill in New Hampshire met with EPA officials in January over concerns they had about their drinking water.

Over the last year, state agencies have tested monitoring wells at the landfill and found contaminants. The EPA also conducted a five-year study that concluded last year, but pledged to continuing monitoring the landfill until there is no more contamination.

SeaCoastOnline.com has more:

The Coakley Landfill Group (CLG) is responsible for paying for remediation at the site. Portsmouth City Attorney Robert Sullivan has said the CLG includes Portsmouth, North Hampton, Newington, the U.S. Air Force and several private companies, mostly trash haulers and generators.

Sullivan, who represents the CLG, said “I have not seen the letter” when asked about the potential financial impact the group could face if the EPA agreed that a treatment or containment system needs to be installed at the landfill.

“I wouldn’t want to comment on the letter without seeing it,” Sullivan said.

Many area residents are worried chemicals leaching from the landfill, which is located in Greenland and North Hampton, will contaminate their residential drinking wells.

Read the full story here.

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