EPA Landfill Program Recognizes Two Landfill Projects for Excellence

EPA Landfill Program Recognizes Two Landfill Projects for Excellence

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)’s Landfill Methane Outreach Program (LMOP) has recognized two landfill projects for their achievements in creating renewable energy while protecting the climate and strengthening the economy.

The LMOP recognized for 2013 the Blue Ridge Renewable Energy Plant in Pennsylvania and the Seminole Road Landfill Renewable Fuels Facility in Georgia, the EPA said in a news release. The agency also recognized as its LMOP Community Partner of the Year the Gaston County Solid Waste and Recycling Division in North Carolina.

A public-private partnership with IESI Blue Ridge Landfill and the borough of Chambersburg brought online the Blue Ridge plant, which produces 6.4 megawatts of landfill gas-to-energy (LFGTE). The facility overcame several obstacles, including a shopping mall, a high-voltage power line, an interstate, wetlands, a stream, a housing subdivision and a farmer’s fields. It also was structured to minimize impacts on birds.

In Georgia, DeKalb County sought a way to use its excess landfill gas and reduce emissions from county vehicles. It developed a natural gas and compressed natural gas (CNG) fuels facility and bought about 40 CNG-fueled vehicles. Some of the gas also is delivered to nearby Atlanta Gas Light and to the public.

Together, these projects will avoid the emissions of 276,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent per year, the EPA said.

Gaston County won the community partner award for its voluntary gas collection system, a self-developed landfill gas to electricity project (2.8 megawatts) and the infrastructure beginnings of a new eco-industrial park.

The LMOP annual award goes to partners that show excellence in innovation and creativity, success in promoting landfill gas-to-energy, and achieve both environmental and economic benefits.

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