Need to Know
10 Things You Need to Know for the Waste & Recycling Industry Today (September 3, 2014)

10 Things You Need to Know for the Waste & Recycling Industry Today (September 3, 2014)


  1. Van Buren landfill seeks tenfold increase in radiation allowances “A hazardous waste landfill near Belleville that has gained the attention of Michigan lawmakers for accepting low-activity radioactive oil and gas fracking waste from other states is seeking approval for a tenfold increase in allowable radiation levels in the materials it receives. The owners of the Wayne Disposal landfill, between I-94 and Willow Run Airport in Van Buren Township, filed an application with the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality last October, seeking a hike in the radiation limit of materials it accepts and stores from the current 50 picocuries per gram up to 500 picocuries per gram.” (
  2. Investing in waste “It’s a dirty job, but someone has to do it. Municipalities across the country are investing in solid waste disposal programs and facilities. Govalytics, a sales and marketing tool has compiled the top ten communities investing in waste.” (American City & County)
  3. Texas AG Thinks Bag Bans May Be Illegal “Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott says municipal bans on single-use plastic bags may violate state law, throwing into question bans passed in several cities, including Dallas, Austin, Laredo and Brownsville. State Rep. Dan Flynn, R-Canton, asked in February for Abbott's nonbinding opinion on whether the bans are legal under the Texas Health and Safety Code.” (Courthouse News Service)
  4. Huge spike in tickets for recycling violations “Recycling violations skyrocketed to nearly 56,000 citywide in the first six months of Mayor de Blasio’s tenure, a 47 percent surge over the same period last year under Mayor Bloomberg and 24 percent higher than in the first half of 2012. Critics slammed de Blasio for the ticket blitz, saying it’s a blatant grab for greenbacks rather than a sign City Hall is going green.” (The New York Post)
  5. Organic Material Recycling Momentum Builds “As the biogas sector grows, it is faced with a new challenge. Biogas systems convert decaying organic material into useable energy and a soil amendment. As more systems come on line in jurisdictions where there are financial incentives for biogas, competition is increasing for organic material, the feedstock that provides these systems with their source of energy and provides a critical revenue stream.” (Biomass Magazine)
  6. Redwood City picks up $1.3 million surplus by overcharging for garbage pickup “The good news is that Redwood City doesn't need to raise garbage rates this year, and possibly not in the next few years either. The bad news is the reason for that -- residents and businesses have been overcharged in past years. As a result, the city's garbage collection fund has a $1.3 million surplus.” (San Jose Mercury-News)
  7. Elk County looks at expanding recycling center “Currently at capacity, Elk County’s recycling program is considering a $2 million expansion project to meet the needs of its recycling center in St. Marys. A $50,000 planning grant through DEP is allowing the program to ‘look at the big picture’ of a potential expansion, including how much material is out there to sustain a larger facility.” (Courier Express)
  8. DEP extends deadline for decision on proposed Penobscot County landfill “The Maine Department of Environmental Protection will take another 30 days to determine if the public will benefit from a controversial integrated solid waste and recycling facility with a landfill in Greenbush or Argyle planned by an organization representing more than 180 Maine towns. ‘There is a lot to consider,’ Karen Knuuti, DEP project analyst, said Tuesday about the Municipal Review Committee’s permit application. ‘It’s a long process.’” (Bangor Daily News)
  9. St. Paul presses ahead with plans for bids on recycling “Faced with potential fee increases for St. Paul residents, Mayor Chris Coleman's administration is backing off plans to roll out wheeled, lidded carts next year for household recycling. The decision is the latest flashpoint between St. Paul and its longstanding recycling partner, Eureka Recycling. The Minneapolis-based nonprofit repeatedly has pressed for contract extensions. Meanwhile, the city plans to open its recycling program to competitive bids at the end of 2015. The mayor's administration maintains that city residents are paying more for recycling services than taxpayers in Minneapolis or Maplewood but receiving less service.” (
  10. Anaheim Hauler Pays $10k Fine for Schlepping Hazardous Waste for 3 Years Without State OK “California's Environmental Protection Agency recently got an Anaheim hazardous waste hauler to pay a $10,500 fine and sign a consent order agreeing that it transported hazardous waste at least 370 times over a three-year period without state-required registration or other authorization to do so. The state EPA's Department of Toxic Substances Control and All County Environmental & Restoration Inc. of Anaheim agree that the unauthorized hauling happened Sept. 11, 2010, through Dec. 12, 2013, according to the consent order officials from both signed on Aug. 22.” (OC Weekly)
Hide comments


  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.