Need to Know
10 Things You Need to Know for the Waste & Recycling Industry Today (October 22, 2014)

10 Things You Need to Know for the Waste & Recycling Industry Today (October 22, 2014)


  1. Los Angeles County takes steps to limit landfill waste “The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday set a goal of diverting 80 percent of waste from unincorporated communities away from landfills by 2025, equivalent to disposing no more than three pounds per person per day.” (
  2. Trash Fight is Sequel to Bloomberg Battle “The City Council is considering a law to limit the impact of the city's sanitation system on the communities who host most of New York's garbage infrastructure. For those of you who think you've seen this movie before, you're half right: The proposal would double-down on a nine-year-old plan that was supposed to solve the underlying problem. The brawl over that earlier initiative—the 2005 Solid Waste Management Plan, lovingly nicknamed ‘the swamp’—was one of the real legislative tussles of the Bloomberg years.” (City Limits)
  3. With cutting-edge technology, Dane County eyes zero emissions at landfill “If Dane County's latest push to combat climate change is successful, local watering holes might soon be serving suds carbonated with carbon dioxide made from decomposing trash. ‘We'd be willing to use waste CO2 if it were properly tested and we were able to test it with our products,’ says the Great Dane's Robert LoBreglio, a co-founder of the local brewpub. ‘After that it's all logistics’ In his 2015 budget proposal, County Executive Joe Parisi has requested nearly $400,000 to test a patent-pending technology many believe is capable of capturing 100% of the greenhouse gas produced at the county's 220-acre solid waste facility on U.S. Highway 12 at County Road AB.” (
  4. Waste firm chief eyes a tipping point in attitudes “While it may once have been a dirty job that someone had to do, Viridor chief executive Ian McAulay is at pains to point out the far-reaching changes the waste management industry is undergoing. The Govan-born businessman remembers playing football at Toryglen and then later in life having to use what was locally known as "the tip", which is soon to be the site of the company's £154 million Recycling and Renewable Energy Centre (RREC) at Polmadie on the south side of Glasgow.” (The Herald Scotland)
  5. Waste Pro Signs Lease to Expand Lakewood Headquarters “Waste Pro USA Inc. has recently signed a lease agreement for close to 15,000 square feet of Class A office space at The Springs office building, where the company has resided in the past fifteen years.” (Commercial Property Executive)
  6. Georgia Supreme Court rules against Newton in East Georgia landfill case “A clerical error in the past may cause an unwelcome neighbor in the present. The Supreme Court of Georgia Monday ruled that Newton County must take action that could allow East Georgia Land and Development Co. to build a solid waste landfill next to the county’s landfill because of a Board of Commissioners clerical error in 1985.” (Newton Citizen)
  7. Southern Maine communities to share $1 million in waste and recycling revenue “Greater Portland communities will share a $1 million rebate from ecomaine, the regional waste incinerator and recycling cooperative. Ecomaine announced the one-time rebate Tuesday morning and said it would set aside an additional $500,000 on surplus revenue to offset any future downturn in the recycling market.” (Portland Press Herald)
  8. Vermont Prison Becomes a Recycling and Composting Trailblazer “We spend so much time here at TriplePundit talking about how companies and universities are becoming more sustainable, it is easy to forget the sustainability agenda is going on everywhere, and yes, that includes government. To that end, more prisons are making moves to become more environmentally responsible. The latest is the Northwest State Corrections Facility in Swanton, Vermont. Recently the women’s prison, which incarcerates over 200 prisoners, announced it had become compliant with the state’s 2012 solid waste and recycling law.” (TriplePundit)
  9. New recycling contract would pay money to city “More than eight months after its former recycling contractor went bankrupt, forcing the city to spend nearly $200,000 to maintain the service, Pittsburgh is ready to award a new contract that would generate money for the city from household glass, plastic, metal and newspaper. The city put the recycling work out for bid last spring but was forced to cancel the process and rebid after several vendors "miscalculated" their bids because of incorrect assumptions about the market value of recyclables, said chief operations officer Guy Costa.” (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette)
  10. Taking out the trash: Middletown saves $1.5 million with new hauling contract “Middletown residents will see $50 taken off their tax bill next year, as a result of a new trash collection contract the board of supervisors approved Monday night. The three-year, $12.8 million contract with Waste Management will cost taxpayers $1.5 million less over its duration than the previous deal. Township Manager Stephanie Teoli Kuhls said that residents will see the trash collection fee on their tax bills go down by $50 from $396 currently.” (Bucks County Courier Times)
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