Need to Know
10 Things You Need to Know for the Waste & Recycling Industry Today (December 15, 2014)

10 Things You Need to Know for the Waste & Recycling Industry Today (December 15, 2014)


  1. Fire destroys Wells transfer station garage “The garage at the transfer station in Wells was destroyed by a fire early Sunday morning. The fire department was called to the station on Willie Hill Road at 2:58 a.m., said Fire Captain Jim Moore. About 60 firefighters from Wells and surrounding towns battled the smoky blaze for about two hours. No one was hurt.” (Portland Press Herald)
  2. Ocean County Looks to Renew Recycling Agreement With Brick, Other Towns “Ocean County’s recycling agreements with its 33 municipalities are about to end, but officials in every town in the county have indicated that they will renew the revenue-sharing program. The program, which started in 1995, has saved towns over $100 million in so-called ‘tipping fees,’ the price of dumping trash in a landfill, said Freeholder Jim Lacey.” (Brick Shorebeat)
  3. N.D. proposes changes in oilfield waste rules “Oil companies may be allowed to dispose of radioactive oilfield waste at some North Dakota landfills instead of hauling it out of state under new rules proposed by the state Health Department.” (Associated Press)
  4. Faced with lawsuit, Pa. landfill pledges continued communication with residents, officials “Waste Management officials, faced with a lawsuit from residents seeking to force an end to noxious odors from the Tullytown landfill, said the litigation would not distract them from their ongoing communication efforts with their neighbors.” (
  5. How scrap metal recycling is shaping the US economy “Recycling and reusing valuable material resources is a key part of the green economy. The significance of the 'circular' aspect any sustainable economy is beginning to take hold in the corporate world, but there are still many unknowns. Environmentalist Anna Staley takes us through the enormous opportunity that scrap metal recycling alone represents for a developed economy like the USA.” (Green Economy Coalition)
  6. Higher fees not covering cost of trash collection in Bloomington “The city of Bloomington is anticipating a $2.3 million shortfall in its solid waste program despite higher fees that took effect in May. With the higher monthly fees, the city expected to see a corresponding decrease in general fund tax support to operate the service.” (
  7. Indiana agency approves grants to expand recycling “The Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM) has approved grants totaling $600,000 to four companies operating in Indiana to help expand their recycling operations. In addition to the grants, the four companies combined have committed to investing $2.9 million to strengthen recycling in Indiana.” (Recycling Today)
  8. Rumpke says company takes recycling seriously “Recently, a Marietta resident wrote a letter to the editor indicating that Rumpke isn't recycling the items it collects. Let us assure you that Rumpke does recycle your items. In the last decade alone, Rumpke has invested more than $50 million to build some of the most technologically advanced recycling facilities in the nation.” (The Marietta Times)
  9. Private landfill sought in Caroline County “A recycling company is seeking permission to build a private landfill in Caroline County. The county Board of Supervisors is considering a text amendment to the solid-waste management plan that would allow a private facility for ‘construction, demolition, debris and limited commercial waste.’” (
  10. Landfill operator explores ‘pay as you throw’ “The Central Landfill – the final repository for much of Rhode Island’s trash – is filling up and costs are on the rise, which could mean higher fees for many state residents. Recycling more and tossing less could address those looming concerns, and the R.I. Resource Recovery Corporation, the agency that manages the Johnston facility, is considering a plan that would encourage such behavior.” (Providence Business News)
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