Mars candy bar

Mars Achieves Zero Waste to Landfill Goal

Mars Inc., manufacturer of confectionery, pet food and other food products, has released its sixth annual Principals in Action Summary, which reveals the company’s success in the sectors of sustainability, health and wellbeing, food safety, responsible marketing and workplace engagement.

Mars generates 10 million tons of product annually, and now the company sends zero waste from its 126 global manufacturing sites to landfill. The company has come a long way since 2007, when it used to send over 154,000 ton of waste to landfill.

“We have made significant progress toward making our operations truly sustainable over the last five years,” said Mars Chief Sustainability and Health & Wellbeing Officer Barry Parkin in a press release. “Our associates are engaged in the work we are doing, and we’re proud that, as of the end of 2015, we achieved a 25 percent reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from our operations and generated zero waste to landfill from all of our factories around the world. But we also missed the target in some critical areas—such as sustainable packaging improvements—so there’s plenty more to be done. Over the next five years—and beyond—we will continue to bring our Five Principles to life across our entire supply chain, from farm to consumer.”

In an effort to improve food safety, Mars continues to partner with members of the food industry, academia, NGOs and government agencies. Last year, the company opened its Mars Global Food Safety Center in China to develop pre-competitive research and training.

The company is also ramping up its sustainability efforts. Mars’ Mesquite Creek wind farm in Texas has generated the equivalent of 100 percent of the electricity required to power its U.S. operations in 2015. The company also opened its Moy wind farm in Scotland last year, which will generate enough electricity to power the company’s 12 U.K. sites.

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