Need to Know

New York Announces Historic Commitment to Renewable Energy

The state will spend roughly $1.4 billion on 26 projects over the next four years.

The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) has announced a series of renewable energy projects the state will undergo over the next four years. The state will spend roughly $1.4 billion, making it the single largest commitment to renewable energy by a state in U.S. history.

Among the 26 projects, 22 utility-scale solar farms will be constructed along with three wind farms and one hydroelectric project. One of the wind farms will feature an energy storage component, making it the first of its kind in the state of New York.

Solar Industry has more information:

NYSERDA says the projects are expected to generate enough renewable energy to power more than 430,000 homes and create over 3,000 short- and long-term well-paying jobs. The projects also advance the Clean Climate Careers initiative, announced by Cuomo in June 2017. The initiative focuses on accelerating renewable energy and energy efficiency to make New York home to 40,000 new, good-paying clean energy jobs by 2020.

Award recipients were chosen from a pool of 88 applications from 30 clean energy developers. During the competitive selection process, bonus points were awarded to renewable energy projects that demonstrated a commitment to the creation of local jobs and the use of locally manufactured components. The two-step review process also included non-price criteria to evaluate the applications. The criteria included scoring for the developer’s experience in constructing and financing renewable projects; the developer’s previous project development experience in New York; and the project’s development status related to grid interconnection, permitting and site control. Proposals were reviewed and scored by a technical committee of professional independent evaluators.

Read the full story here.

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