Honoring the Industry's Workforce on National Garbage Man Day

In celebration of National Garbage Man Day on June 17, Waste360 recognizes some of the hardworking members of the waste and recycling industry.

The waste and recycling industry may be one of the most dangerous industries in the U.S., but it’s comprised of dedicated, hardworking individuals who are committed to reducing waste, increasing recycling and improving the quality of the environment. These workers often don’t receive the recognition they deserve because many people are unaware of the hard work that happens beyond curbside pickup. From sorting materials to managing landfills and materials recovery facilities to transforming waste into energy, these workers do it all.

Beyond their typical job duties, these workers are also actively involved in their communities and often serve as a neighborhood watch. They interact with children to fulfill their dreams of seeing a garbage truck up close and think on their feet when dangerous situations arise.

"Speaking on behalf of John Arwood, the founder of National Garbage Man Day, we are so excited that June 17 and this special week has finally arrived,” says Steven Goode, president and CEO of Dumpster Mate. “This day was established to recognize the many men and women across America who do such a fantastic job every day of the week in our industry. We are all proud of them and thank them for their dedication. Those of us in the industry are proud to be in it and appreciate this opportunity to say ‘thank you’ to those hardworking men and women who make it all happen.”

In celebration of National Garbage Man Day, Waste360 is recognizing some of the day-to-day contributions of the industry's workforce and some of their exceptional efforts thus far this year.

Have a story you would like to share or an individual/company you would like to honor? Head on over to Twitter and mention @Waste360 with hashtag #NationalGarbageManDay!

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