Covanta Upgrading Waste-to-Energy Unit in New York

Covanta Upgrading Waste-to-Energy Unit in New York

Covanta Holding Corp. will upgrade the waste-to-energy (WTE) operation at New York’s Onondaga County with the extension of its agreement to operate and maintain the recycling and WTE facility in Jamesville.

The Morristown, N.J.-based Covanta said it will make investments and upgrades to systems at the facility with the accord with the Onondaga County Resource Recovery Agency (OCRRA).

The accord follows OCRRA successfully financing bonds, according to a news release, and extends another 20 years the partnership that began in the early 1990s.

The facility prioritizes recycling and relies on energy recovery for the remaining material. Electricity and metal recycling revenue from the WTE facility help fund the county’s recycling programs, which have helped the county achieve a recycling rate close to double the national average.

“The county and agency have established a world-class sustainable waste management system that is a true model to be emulated by communities in North America,” said Joey Neuhoff, Covanta vice president of client business management. “We are proud of our contributions to provide safe, reliable and sustainable waste disposal and a source of clean energy.”

Covanta has struggled financially of late. In its first quarter the company lost $37 million, as it was hurt by lower market pricing for metals and energy, as well as other factors, such as the difficult winter weather conditions and the tough Northeast market.

But the firm is moving ahead with projects. It is investing $45 million to build the Advanced Recycling Center next to its waste-to-energy facility in Indianapolis. The recycling facility is scheduled to begin operations in 2016.

The project ncludes partnering with RecycleForce to staff operations. Indianapolis-based RecycleForce provides electronics recycling and social services to help formerly incarcerated individuals rebuild their lives by breaking down the barriers to employment through transitional jobs and workforce training.

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