Associations, EPA Partner on Recycling Communication Project

Associations, EPA Partner on Recycling Communication Project

Three waste and recycling organizations along with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are joining together on an initiative to make recycling requirements clearer to Americans.

The initial effort in this campaign is the “Top 10 in the Bin” list of the most widely and easily recycled items in the United States. Working with the EPA on the project is the National Waste & Recycling Association (NW&RA), the Solid Waste Association of North America (SWANA) and Keep America Beautiful (KAB), according to a news release.

The organizations worked with their constituents and recycling experts from industry, government and nonprofits to develop the “Top 10 in the Bin” list, which will be used by their members and affiliates to communicate about proper recycling. A 2014 NW&RA survey reported that a third of Americans are not clear on what materials go into recycling containers.

“There is demand for high-quality recyclable material that can be turned into new products, but the key is ensuring that there are consistent, clean recyclables,” said Sharon Kneiss, president and CEO of NW&RA. “Americans should ‘know before they throw’ when recycling – it’s important to put the right materials in the bin.”

 The organizations will provide a series of “Top 10 in the Bin” infographics leading up to KAB’s America Recycles Day, which takes place Nov. 15. The group will partner on additional recycling communications subsequently.

“This initiative is about making the recycling of basic items easy to understand and to help make it second nature to recycle,” said Jennifer Jehn, KAB president and CEO. “As a result, more material will get recycled and will be used to become new products.”

 Added John Skinner, executive director and CEO of SWANA, “A picture is worth a thousand words. We hope this flyer and our future efforts speak volumes about what to recycle.”



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